Advertisement

Titan Custom Yachts 62 | Boat Review

Carolina lines built in the white marlin capital of the world

March 19, 2020
Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on pinterest
Share on email
Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on pinterest
Share on email
The Titan Custom Yachts, Effie Mae, out on the water.
Effie Mae, underway off Ocean City, Maryland. Courtesy Titan Custom Yachts

The American flag snapped in the breeze at Ocean City, Maryland’s Sunset Marina in early September 2019 as I walked down the famed C dock on a crisp morning. I was looking forward to stepping aboard the new 62-foot Titan, Effie Mae. Built primarily for long-range comfort, and outfitted to fish the highly competitive mid-Atlantic tournament circuit, Hull No. 7 certainly met the mark and checked every one of the custom-boat boxes.

At first glance, the sizable teak-soled cockpit and elegant mezzanine seating is immediately noticeable, compliments of the boat’s 19-foot-2-inch beam. A beautifully crafted Release Marine Trillion Series fighting chair is the center of attention here, while just forward of the chair stanchion, a Seakeeper 16 gyrostabilizer is nestled in the deck, giving Effie Mae an impressive 92 percent roll reduction plus easy access to the gyrostabilizer.

The cockpit and fighting chair of the Titan Custom Yachts 62 Effie Mae.
The sizeable cockpit features a Release Marine Trillion Series fighting chair. Courtesy Titan Custom Yachts

Cockpit and Bridge

For live-bait fishermen, there is more than 50 gallons’ worth of livewell space in the transom and on the port and starboard sides of the chair in the cockpit sole, while a 16,000 Btu Cruisair air-conditioning system keeps the mezzanine comfortable in hot weather. Under the mezzanine seating is a large freezer, and tucked under the portside step, a massive 240-plus-­gallon refrigerator/freezer fish box. To the right of the salon door, a single jump seat covers an electric grill with a tackle center below it—zero wasted space.

Advertisement
The helm of the Titan Custom Yachts 62 Effie Mae.
The peninsula helm features a pair of Garmin 24-inch multi-function displays and L-shaped seating forward of the console. Courtesy Titan Custom Yachts

A clean and uncluttered bridge deck has a peninsular console design that is complemented by a gleaming Release Marine teak helm pod. Twin Disc single-lever controls—complete with buttons in the levers—offer hands-free operation of the hydraulic Side-Power variable-­speed bow thruster. The two 24-inch Garmin 8624s are integrated into multiple systems, including a Furuno 360 CSH-8LMK and Airmar 589 LHW sounders, Garmin SideVu scanning sonar, and a Garmin GMX54 satellite weather receiver/antenna, complete with SiriusXM’s new Fish Mapping service.

Watch: Check out Effie Mae underway here.

The hardtop houses twin Miya Epoch US-9 Super teaser reels, a flush drop-down compartment with twin VHFs, as well as a drop-down rod locker with storage for eight outfits. An L-shaped seating arrangement forward of the console and a single bench seat to starboard provide plenty of comfortable space for eight people.

Advertisement
Interior salon of the Titan Custom Yachts 62, Effie Mae.
The interior woodwork is sapele mahogany, finished in high gloss. Courtesy Titan Custom Yachts

Salon and Accommodations

A sleek push-button actuator opens the custom teak door to the salon, boasting rich, high-gloss sapele mahogany cabinets. The plush leather L-shaped couch seating to port offers lots of storage opportunities for electric reels and tackle, while a raised U-shaped dinette with room for four sits to starboard, just forward of the entertainment center.

More rod storage drops down from an overhead rod locker with room for another eight outfits, and in the galley, KitchenAid refrigerated and freezer drawers are beneath the lightweight gray-and-white-swirled granite countertops, which also have a recessed Kenyon electric soft-touch glass cooktop and a GE convection oven tucked away in an overhead cabinet.

The master stateroom of the Titan Custom Yachts 62 Effie Mae.
Each of the boat’s three staterooms offers spacious comfort plus plenty of additional storage. Courtesy Titan Custom Yachts

Conveniently, each stateroom in Effie Mae’s three-stateroom, three-head layout has its own full head and shower. As you walk down the companionway stairs—where each step offers even more storage—the master stateroom is to port with a double-bunk crew stateroom adjacent to starboard. Moving forward from the master, a stacked Bosch washer/dryer combination hides behind the door to your left. The forward guest stateroom is fully lined with cabinets, offering endless possibilities for fishing tackle or belongings during those extended trips offshore.

Advertisement
The engine room of the Titan Custom Yachts 62 Effie Mae
The MAN V12 engines easily power the boat to a top speed of 38 knots. Courtesy Titan Custom Yachts

Engine Room

Hiding beneath the teak mezzanine step, a lift-up hatch provides engine room access where the remarkably quiet and fuel-efficient MAN V12 1,400 hp IMO Tier III engines gleam in a sea of white.

As you step through the watertight bulkhead sub door, you’ll quickly notice that Titan takes pride in making sure every system and maintenance point is easily accessible. A 24 kw Onan generator and Dometic 800-gallon-per-day watermaker sits to starboard, with the Cruisair and Side-Power hydraulic systems to port.

Storage cabinets for filters, spare parts and a large tool chest forward hold all the gear necessary for any underway repairs, and a marine fire-suppression system is integrated into the engine management system to offer an extra layer of ­security and protection.

Advertisement
The mezzanine of the Titan Custom Yachts 62 Effie Mae.
A look at the comfortable mezzanine seating and starboard-side bridge access. Courtesy Titan Custom Yachts

Construction

When it comes to construction, Titan owner Russ Garufi—a prior residential builder who built over 10,000 homes—focuses precise attention to detail with his cold-molded construction process. From the meticulous positioning of each joint to glassing every possible component in the superstructure, he prides himself on building an incredibly strong boat that can withstand the test of time: “Built to last 100 years,” he says.

Garufi recalls seeing too many splintered bows from piling encounters as captains maneuvered in and out of their tight slips, and says early on he thought to himself, That will never happen with my boats. The 62’s clear Douglas fir chines, stringers and sheerbeam—which span the boat from the cockpit gunwales to the foredeck—provide extreme protection above and below the waterline, while her bottom is comprised of three layers of half-inch Okoume BS1088 marine-grade plywood laminated with 1708 and 1808 biaxial fiberglass. Her hull sides, which are constructed of two layers of ⅜-inch Okoume, are similarly laminated.

The Titan Custom Yachts, Effie Mae, out on the water.
Built to perform at the highest levels, Effie Mae is sure to be a serious competitor on the East Coast tournament circuit for many years. Courtesy Titan Custom Yachts

Performance

Having spent time on some of the top sport-fishing boats in the industry, when I tossed the stern lines to embark on our sea trial, I could not believe how quiet and smooth the MAN engines were. Working the Twin Disc controls to maneuver and spin out of the slip, not a single hatch rattled or vibrated.

Garufi eased up the throttles as we approached the inlet, with the five-bladed Veem Interceptor props quickly jumping us up on plane. I still could not get over how quiet the engines were. A strong southeast wind was gusting over 20 mph and bucking the outgoing tide, stacking up a respectable 4-foot chop in the inlet. Effie Mae held her own as she effortlessly punched through the standing waves at 28 knots without a single shudder or a slam.

Read Next: Learn more about the birth of Carolina-style sportfishermen here.

Turning south, her Carolina-style flare comfortably sliced through the tight 3- to 4-foot head sea at a cruising speed of 30 knots—1,900 rpm with an 80 percent load and sipping fuel at just 100 gallons per hour. Slowing her down to 28 knots—1,800 rpm— and she burned 86 gph at a 70 percent load.

Reaching a top speed of 38 knots—2,250 rpm at 140 gph—we put her through her paces, making sure to run in the seas from every direction, impressing me with an ultrasmooth ride and exceptional seakeeping ability, even when sitting side-to and the gyro off. Once turned on, the roll was quickly and significantly reduced. At trolling speeds, the 62-footer presented a prop wash with clear lanes, and by the third wave, would have any serious billfisherman nodding with approval and ready to fire out a pitch bait.

There is no doubt in my mind that the Bishopville, Maryland, boatbuilder has learned a thing or two about construction over his tenure as a homebuilder. And even with Garufi’s claim to produce a product that’s likely to last 100 years, after my Titan experience, I’m inclined to believe his bold statement. Long live Effie Mae.

Titan Custom Yachts 62 Specs

  • LOA: 62′8″
  • Beam: 19′2″
  • Draft: 4′8″
  • Displ: 80,000 lb.
  • Fuel: 2,000 gal.
  • Water: 275 gal.
  • Power: Twin MAN V12 1,550 hp
  • Gears: Twin Disc
  • Propellers: Veem, 5-blade Interceptor
  • PAINT: Pettit Black Widow (Antifouling); Awlgrip Awlcraft 2000 (Superstructure)
  • Climate Control: Cruisair


Advertisement

More Boats

Advertisement