Striped Marlin 101

How much do you know about
 the prettiest marlin?

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Many anglers consider the striped marlin to be the perfect billfish.Scott Kerrigan / Aquapaparazzi.com
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Striped marlin are a Pacific species; however, they still cover the most extensive range of any billfish species.Scott Kerrigan / Aquapaparazzi.com
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Unlike most marlin, which are primarily solitary creatures for most of their lives, striped marlin will school up like sailfish and feed cooperatively.Brandon Cole
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Because striped marlin often cruise on the surface, sight-fishing for them is one of the most popular and productive tactics, especially in Southern California and down through Baja to Cabo San Lucas. Spend the extra money and buy a good set of gyrostabilized binoculars, such as the Fraser Optics' Mariner Series.Staff
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Much like their white-marlin cousins in the Atlantic, striped marlin spend much of their fighting time in the air — everybody loves a jumper!Scott Kerrigan / Aquapaparazzi.com
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Stripies readily bite a wide variety of baits, and because of their habit of tailing on the surface, they also offer anglers the unique opportunity to sight-cast to individual fish.Scott Kerrigan / Aquapaparazzi.com
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The most definitive way to tell the difference between a striped marlin and a blue marlin is the dorsal fin. A striped marlin’s dorsal fin is much taller, nearly as tall as the depth of the body.Brandon Cole
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A blue marlin’s dorsal fin is no taller than roughly half of the depth of its body. So, if your marlin has a very tall dorsal, it’s a stripey.Dave Ferrell