Striped Marlin Action

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Giant Striped marlin are the main attraction for many anglers who make the long journey to New Zealand. Photo by Doug PerrineDoug Perrine
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The author, “Bonze” Fleet, releases a nice stripey boat-side that was caught on one of his lures. Photo by Nikolaj MathesonNikolaj Matheson
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Fleet began making lures and tackle systems to help catch big billfish from the small, center-console boats commonly used offshore in New Zealand. Photo by Nikolaj MathesonNikolaj Matheson
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Striped marlin readily pounce on smaller-sized lures, and you can get a good hookup ratio by using smaller hooks in single-hook rigs as well. Photo by Mike Harris/Fish PicsMike Harris/Fish Pics
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An IGFA-legal hook-set keeps the eye of the trailing hook just inside the lure’s skirt. Photo by Bonze FleetBonze Fleet
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Photo by Mike Harris/Fish PicsMike Harris/Fish Pics
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Big fish in the 300-pound range call for heavier tackle, but that doesn’t mean you need to use bigger lures and hooks. Big striped marlin will eat 7-inch lures, and the smaller hooks are plenty strong on the leader. Photo by Doug PerrineDoug Perrine
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Big fish in the 300-pound range call for heavier tackle, but that doesn’t mean you need to use bigger lures and hooks. Big striped marlin will eat 7-inch lures, and the smaller hooks are plenty strong on the leader. Photo by Capt. Mark PhillipsCapt. Mark Phillips
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On the northern end of New Zealand, the Bay of Islands offers dramatic landscapes certain to enthrall world travelers.** ** Photo Courtesy of Douglas Pearson/Robert Harding World Imagery/Corbis